Family Dental Center

Posts for: August, 2014

By Family Dental Center
August 29, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene   floss  
NewOrleansClaimtoDentalInvention

Think of New Orleans, Louisiana, and what comes to mind? The sound of jazz pouring out from a nightclub in the French Quarter… the smell of shrimp boiling in a spicy gumbo… the fresh feeling you get after you’ve cleaned between your teeth with dental floss?

You may not know it, but besides its culinary charms and musical mojo, New Orleans has another claim to fame: It’s the historical home of dental floss. In the early 1800’s, a pioneering dentist by the name of Dr. Levi Spear Parmly recommended that his patients clean between their teeth with a silken thread. Long before the role of oral bacteria was recognized, it was Dr. Parmly’s belief that cavities were caused by foreign material on the tooth surfaces. But it took until nearly the end of the century for his invention to become available in handy dispensers. And the rest, as they say, is history.

Today, of course, we know much more about the causes and treatment of tooth decay. For example, we know that harmful bacteria in plaque — the sticky biofilm that builds up on your teeth in the absence of effective cleaning — release chemical substances that erode tooth enamel; this causes cavities (tiny holes in the tooth) to begin forming. We also know that while brushing alone helps remove plaque, it’s far and away more effective when combined with flossing.

Yet there’s one thing we’re still not sure of: Why don’t more people use dental floss regularly? Did you know that with careful attention to your oral hygiene, tooth decay is almost completely preventable? Plus, dental floss is now available in many different varieties: It’s no longer made of silk, but can consist of nylon or gore-tex thread; it comes waxed or unwaxed, round or flat… even flavored like mint or bubble gum!

So here’s our suggestion: Find a style of dental floss you like, picture yourself on Bourbon Street… and spend a few minutes flossing every day. Your teeth will say “merci beaucoup.”

If you would like more information about flossing and cavity prevention, please call our office to schedule a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Decay.”


By Family Dental Center
August 18, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Oral Surgery  

oral surgeryThe realm of dentistry is expanding faster and wider than most people can even imagine. Gone are the days of the primeval dentistry on the Western frontier, when the local barber doubled as the person who was somehow qualified to pull out a molar at the first sign of a toothache. Dentists today—especially the ones at Family Dental Center in Glenview, IL—are highly trained professionals who are well-versed in a wide range of practices, including oral surgeries. Procedures that could only be obtained from medical professionals at a hospital in the past are now relatively common outpatient procedures. Oral surgery can range from routine practices like tooth extractions and implant placement to jaw realignment and emergency operations for facial trauma.

Impacted Teeth

Wisdom teeth are the last set of teeth to develop. For most people, these teeth do not emerge from the gum line, or if they do, the jaw is not large enough to support them and they butt against the neighboring teeth. Dentists refer to this common condition as an ”impacted tooth”—where the crown becomes lodged in between the gum tissue and the jawbone. Impacted wisdom teeth can result in swelling, pain, and even infection of the gums. Wisdom teeth that do not emerge and fall into alignment naturally can cause permanent damage to adjacent teeth as well, and they can sometimes lead to the formation of cysts or tumors that can destroy sections of the jaw. Glenview dentists advise people with impacted wisdom teeth have them surgically removed.

Though this condition is most common in wisdom teeth, cuspids and bicuspids can also become impacted and can cause the same types of problems described with impacted wisdom teeth. As with wisdom teeth, most dentists will recommend oral surgery to remove them.

Dental Implants

Family Dental Center also offers dental implant surgery to Glenview patients that have lost teeth due to disease, decay, or injury. Dental implants—cylindrical posts usually made of titanium—are surgically placed in the jawbone (unlike regular dentures, which simply sit on top of the gum) to create a studier foundation for replacement teeth. As the jaw heal, the implant will fuse to the natural bone. Though this process can take several weeks to complete, it won’t interfere with everyday life.

Other Surgical Procedures

The aforementioned procedures are some of the most common oral surgeries performed today. However, the staff at Family Dental Center is also equipped to provide special oral surgery procedures to Glenview patients. Below are some other services their staff provides:

  • tooth extractions
  • corrective jaw surgery
  • sleep apnea treatments
  • joint surgery for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders
  • facial trauma and reconstructive surgery
  • cleft lip/palate procedures

To learn more about oral surgery offered in the Glenview area, call (847) 998-1281.


By Family Dental Center
August 13, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
RealityStarKeptHisEyesonthePrizeNewTeeth

If you follow the hit TV reality show Amazing Race, you know that professional-hockey-playing brothers Bates and Anthony Battaglia won the $1 million prize in the latest globe-spanning competition. You may also have witnessed Anthony removing his false front teeth from time to time — like when he had to dive for pearls in Bora Bora. Since he plans to resume his sports career, Anthony wears a partial denture to fill the gap in his classic “hockey mouth.” He has said that when he finally hangs up his skates, he will use some of his Amazing Race prize money to get new, permanent teeth. When it's time to get that new smile, Anthony, like many people, will have to choose between two good options for permanent tooth replacement.

The preferred option for most people is dental implants. In this system, tiny titanium posts substitute for the root part of your missing tooth (or teeth). These are placed beneath your gum line in a minor surgical procedure we perform right here at the dental office. The amazing thing about dental implants is that they actually fuse to your jawbone, allowing your replacement teeth to last a lifetime.

The titanium implant itself is not visible in the mouth; the part of an implant tooth that you see is the lifelike crown. Virtually indistinguishable from your natural teeth, the crown is attached to the implant above the gum line. Dental implants can be used to replace a single tooth, multiple teeth, or even all your teeth. You don't necessarily need one implant for every tooth because implants can support bridgework or even a complete set of prosthetic teeth.

The second-best option is a natural-tooth fixed bridge. In this system, we use healthy natural teeth on either side of the empty space left by a missing tooth (or teeth) as supports for one or more of the prosthetic teeth that will fill the gap. The downside is that in order to turn these healthy teeth into supports (which are referred to in dentistry as “abutments”), we need to remove some enamel and then cap them. This procedure can leave those teeth more prone to decay than they were before. But with regular dental exams and good oral hygiene on your part, bridgework can last many years.

Which system is right for you? That's a question we would be happy to help you determine... even if you haven't won a large jackpot or gone pearl diving in Bora Bora. If you've been looking forward to the day when you can have permanent replacement teeth, why wait? Contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. We will help you find your ideal solution to the problem of missing teeth! For more information, please see the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Dental Implants vs. Bridgework” and “Dental Implants: Your Third Set of Teeth.”


By Family Dental Center
August 01, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene  
AnOralIrrigatorisanEffectiveAlternativetoFlossing

The main strategy in fighting dental disease is to try to prevent it in the first place. The success of this strategy depends largely on effective oral hygiene with three essential elements: daily brushing, daily flossing, and semi-annual checkups with professional cleaning.

Many people have little trouble incorporating brushing into their daily routine; flossing, though, is a different matter for some. They may feel it’s too time-consuming or too hard to perform. Patients with orthodontic appliances especially may encounter difficulty navigating the floss around the appliance hardware.

Flossing, though, is extremely important for removing bacterial plaque, the primary aim of oral hygiene. This thin film of food remnant that builds up and sticks to the teeth is the breeding ground for bacteria that cause both tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. It’s important that as much plaque as possible is removed from the teeth and gum surfaces every day. While brushing removes plaque from the open surfaces of the teeth, flossing removes plaque clinging between teeth and around the gums that can’t be accessed with a toothbrush.

If traditional flossing is too difficult, there’s a viable alternative using an oral irrigator. Also known as a water flosser, an oral irrigator directs a stream of pressurized, pulsating water inside the mouth to blast away plaque in these hard to reach places. The hand applicator comes with a variety of tips that can be used for a number of dental situations, such as cleaning around braces or implants. In home use since the early 1960s, the latest versions of oral irrigators have proven to be very effective, especially for orthodontic patients — research shows an oral irrigator used in conjunction with brushing can remove up to five times more plaque than just brushing alone.

That being said, traditional flossing is also effective at plaque removal when performed properly. Sometimes, resistance to flossing can be remedied with a little training during dental checkups. We can work with you on techniques to improve your flossing activity, as well as train you to use an oral irrigator.

Whichever method you choose, it’s important for you to incorporate flossing (or irrigation) into your daily routine. Removing plaque, especially in those hard to reach places, is essential for reducing your risk of developing destructive dental disease.

If you would like more information on flossing or oral irrigation, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cleaning Between Your Teeth.”